The Three Types of Partners in Your Channel Ecosystem

The Three Types of Partners in Your Channel Ecosystem

If you are in market for a Through-Channel Marketing Automation (TCMA) platform or are contemplating what your Partner Marketing strategy will look like moving forward it is important to consider the types of Partners you have in your channel ecosystem and how they will use the platform.

Most channel ecosystems consist of three main Partner types:

  • On-Site Marketer
  • Do-It-Yourself (DIY)
  • Do-It-For-Me (DIFM)

Let’s dive into each Partner type and consider what’s needed when implementing a TCMA solution tailored to each unique set of Partner needs.

1. On-Site Marketer

On-Site Marketers, our first Partner type, represent less than 5% of all Partners. These Partners are advanced in their marketing knowledge and have a dedicated marketing employee overseeing all aspects of marketing on behalf of the company. They have additional staff members or leverage an outside agency to oversee and execute the marketing for the business. They are primarily utilizing a TCMA platform to gain access to raw files whether it be images, logos or content, so they can build their own unique campaigns with a combination of their own assets and brand assets.

On-Site Marketers are not the type of Partner you design your strategy around, but you do want to provide them access to a large array of imagery and raw files, so they can market your Brand’s specific products or services easily.

2. Do-It-Yourself

We refer to the second type of Partner as Do-It-Yourself (DIY) Partners, who are power users of a TCMA platform. They log in frequently to peruse available self-service marketing assets and campaigns, execute marketing tactics or enroll in campaigns of their choice. DIY Partners usually do not have a large marketing team behind them so it is crucial that whatever platform they are using is easy to use. If you provide them with an intuitive platform and campaigns that are easy to enroll in, they will become more engaged.

3. Do-It-For-Me

The third type of Partner is the Do-It-For-Me (DIFM) Partner. These Partners usually make up anywhere from 60-70% of all Partners in your channel ecosystem. They prefer to have someone else do all the set up for them, and they might not even log into the platform at all.  This may be due to lack of time or marketing knowledge, or it may be because they’re more focused on sales than marketing.

DIFM Partners want the ability to set up all of their customization preferences, such as their business information, marketing budget preferences etc., so that campaigns can be run easily on their behalf. They rely heavily on set-it-and-forget-it subscription programs that automate their marketing efforts and on white-glove-concierge-style support teams that do all the heavy lifting for them.

Regardless of the user types that compose your Partner network, it is imperative that you provide them a platform that caters to their unique needs. At the end of the day, when Brands provide a TCMA platform that delivers added value and a great user experience, Partners tend to respond with an uptick in engagement and participation in Brand local marketing programs.

 

About the Author
Gary Ritkes

Gary Ritkes, President of SproutLoud, oversees all Business Development and Marketing for the company. Gary, a pioneer in the emerging vertical of Distributed Marketing Technology, is an industry leader and innovator with 20+ years experience in graphic communications and marketing strategy. Gary has been involved with SproutLoud since the inception of the company. Prior to joining SproutLoud, Gary was VP of Marketing for Rex Three, Inc., SproutLoud’s first and largest vendor among its network of providers. He has served many Fortune 1000 clients and worldwide advertising agencies in providing marketing technology direction and optimization. He was an original founder of U.S. based Earth Color Group and co-founder of Advanced Digital Services (ADS), which was sold in 1996 to publicly traded Katz Digital Technologies. He has served as a board member of the local chapter of the American Advertising Federation chapter and other national industry associations, including the DMA and AGA.